20 Hacks for CNT

2 hours Technical Studies (Online)
Presented by: Danny Johnson

Course Description: Most of the team hacks referred to in this presentation relate to attracting, retaining and motivating quality team members for Crisis Negotiation Teams (CNT). The secondary benefits of many of these hacks often lead to efficiencies within the team. There is much that can be done, with little financial investment, to create a vibrant and healthy team and improve standing within the agency and community.

Training Objectives:
1. Recognize the power of establishing a team culture.
2. Identify four components of establishing a team.
3. Improve the efficiency of team function.

Who should attend this course: Crisis negotiation team members and crisis negotiation supervisors.

Complimentary seats: WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through December 2020.

Communicating with the Non-responder

2 hours Interpersonal Perspectives (Online)
Presented by: Robert ‘Bob’ Ragsdale

Course description: If you have been a crisis negotiator for any period of time, you have probably encountered a difficult and frustrating subject who does not respond or react to anything you say or do.

“Communicating with the Non-Responder” presents a model for communication to break the silence.  Beginning with the use of available intelligence, potential approaches can be crafted based upon the type of incident and a particular subject.

Effective communication techniques are reinforced for use in the delivery of a script or ‘menu’ of statements and approaches covering a variety topics and areas of subject concern.

Originally developed from the review of recordings of successful non-responder negotiations, these statements and approaches are presented in a logical and chronological order.  An emphasis is placed on the use of a ‘Parallel Approach’ where tactical and negotiation teams operate as one synchronized element, under the incident commander, throughout the incident, using words and, when necessary, tactics to encourage communication and negotiation.

A multi-page handout will be provided to each student for use during the class and to carry with other reference material in their negotiator ‘go-bag.’

Training Objectives:
1. Evaluate intelligence and motivation for subject non-response
2. Develop an approach for effective communication with the non-responder
3. Collaborate with tactical resources for a ‘Parallel Approach’
4. Develop and apply incident- and subject- specific scripts for communication with the non-responder

Who should attend this course: Patrol officers, CIT officers, crisis negotiators, and tactical officers.

Complimentary seats: WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through December 2020.

Co-response: Mental Health Professionals and Law Enforcement

2 hours Interpersonal Perspectives (Online)
Presented by: Susie Kroll, MA, MHP, LMHC, Mental Health Professional and Crisis Negotiation Team member, King County, Washington Sheriff’s Office

Course description: It has never been more important than now to consider well-rounded and holistic community policing and Public Safety. Law enforcement professionals have always been adaptable to radically evolving public safety climates – and current times are no exception. This 2-hour course will provide an introduction to co-response models that describe practical and affordable partnerships between mental health professionals and law enforcement in the response to a myriad of mental health crises.

 
This practical and informative course, based on established programs, will highlight successes as well as lessons learned throughout the process of building relationships, coordinating funding, overcoming barriers and resistance, program implementation and data management.
 
Discussion points include funding options, staffing requirements, and community introductions and partnerships.
 
Certificates will be awarded to all attendees.

 

Training Objectives:
1. Describe co-response mental health professional and law enforcement models.
2. Integrate co-responder model in law enforcement agencies.

Who should attend this course: CIT/ECIT officers, command staff, MHP professionals working in support of law enforcement activities, and others considering practical partnerships in the response to mental health crises within the community.

Complimentary seats: WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through December 2020.

Crisis Negotiation Techniques for Dispatchers Part 1

4 hours Interpersonal Perspectives (Online)
Presented by: Karin Houston and Jan Dubina

Course description: Crisis Negotiation Techniques for Dispatchers (Part 1) is a practical course of instruction for dispatchers, dispatcher supervisors and dispatcher trainers.

This course is designed to prepare dispatchers to mitigate crises involving barricaded subjects, suicidal subjects, hostage takers and other individuals suffering from mental illness or experiencing an emotional or psychological crisis. The course reinforces the critical nature of the interface between dispatchers and first responders as it relates to de-escalation and crisis intervention.

Students will learn the fundamental requirements of a unified law enforcement response to a crisis incident, including the roles of dispatchers and first responders, containment, security and risk management.

Effective communication as a core competency will address the Behavioral Influence Stairway Model, Active Listening Skills and the role of rapport and influence as it relates to crisis intervention.

Training Objectives:
1. Recognize the critical role of dispatchers in crisis intervention.
2. Describe elements of the law enforcement response to a crisis incident.
3. Apply crisis communication techniques with an individual in crisis.

Who should attend this course: Emergency Dispatchers and Emergency Dispatch Supervisors

Complimentary seats: Discounts available for multiple paid enrollments.

De-escalation for the School Environment (SROs)

3 hours Interpersonal Perspectives (Online)
Presented by: Staff  

Course description: At the heart of any thoughtful de-escalation is recognizing a person’s need to feel safe, listened to, and understood.  Nowhere is this more important than in a school environment where school staff and SROs encounter students who are in a high emotional or distressed state on a daily basis.

In this 3-hour course, attendees will learn how to recognize a situation requiring de-escalation, the foundation for readiness, factors contributing to the emotional or psychological crisis of a student and practical guidelines for de-escalation.

Students will also learn how to control scene dynamics and apply risk-effective crisis intervention techniques oriented toward a positive outcome.

Training Objectives:
1. Define de-escalation
2. Identify factors impacting de-escalation
3. Assess and control scene dynamics
4. Apply de-escalation techniques

Who should attend this course:  All SROs, school security and school staff.

Complimentary seats:  Discounts available for multiple paid enrollments.

Emotional Wellness for First Responders

2 hours Interpersonal Perspectives (Online)
Presented by: Tanya Zaglauer-Schmell, Tamara Spencer, Dr. Barbara Palomino

Course description: Caring and giving in difficult circumstances, being exposed to trauma, and providing support to traumatized individuals on a daily basis may lead to the type of burnout which has long-term physical and emotional effects.

This 2-hour online course will provide emergency responders with an understanding of compassion fatigue and what we can do to prevent burnout.

A practical overview and discussion of stress disorders, as well as signs and symptoms of a crisis, will assist us in taking care of ourselves and others.

By taking care of ourselves and practicing ‘stress management,’ we can decrease the physical and emotional wear and tear stress can cause. There are three components of stress: Biological, Cognitive and Learned – and a discussion of these components will give students a deeper understanding of the complexity of stress and what we must do to cope in healthy ways.

In anticipation of the effects of stress, we will learn of the four methods of dealing with long-term stress:  Avoid, Alter, Adapt and Accept.

Lastly, we will talk of the ways each of us can build resiliency as a preventative approach to emotional wellness.

Training Objectives:
1. Identify indicators of compassion fatigue
2. Recognize criteria for stress disorders
3. Apply healthy coping skills for stress management
4. Build resiliency

Who should attend this course: Any member of the emergency services including law enforcement, fire and rescue personnel and dispatchers.

Complimentary seats: Determined on a course-by-course basis.

High-risk Warrant Planning for CNT

2 hours Technical Studies (Online)
Presented by: Karin Houston

Course Description: In the ever-increasing risk environment facing law enforcement, Crisis Negotiation Teams can play an expanded role in warrant service preparation, especially with the gathering of intelligence. While the tactical team focuses on the ‘target location’, intelligence regarding the neighborhood, surrounding facilities, and the subject’s history beyond basic criminal checks, may be critical to reducing risk. This course will cover the expanded role of CNT in high-risk warrant planning and help students develop planning checklists and loud hail scripts. Students will also learn the importance of CNT deployment with tactical teams.

Training Objectives:
1. Plan for high-risk warrant preparation operations.
2. Use checklists and loud hail scripts for high-risk warrant planning.

Who should attend this course: Crisis negotiators and tactical operators.

Complimentary seats: WSHNA, MACN, BANG and IACN members through December 2020.

High-risk Warrant Planning for CNT/Loud Hailing Techniques XL

5 hours – 2 hours Interpersonal Communication /3 hours Technical Studies (Online)
Presented by: Special Agent (Ret) Karin Houston, Robert ‘Bob’ Ragsdale, Sergeant (Ret) Troy King

Course Description: Warrant service is one of two primary circumstances for stand-offs in the United States (Domestic Violence situations are the other). Frequency, the ever-increasing risk environment facing law enforcement and the close scrutiny of warrant service outcomes, compel us to take a closer look at the expanded role of crisis negotiators in the planning and execution of high-risk warrants. Crisis Negotiation Teams can play an expanded role in warrant service preparation, especially with the gathering and analysis of risk-relevant intelligence.

While the tactical team focuses on the ‘target location’, intelligence regarding the neighborhood, surrounding facilities, and the subject’s history beyond basic criminal checks, may be critical to reducing risk. This course will cover the expanded role of CNT in high-risk warrant planning and execution and guide students through the development of planning checklists and loud hail scripts.

Techniques regarding the management of non-responsive subjects will be addressed with emphasis on collaborative approaches with tactical resources. This course will require students to participate in the preparation of planning and intelligence checklists and loud hail scripts for a variety of warrant service circumstances. Students will also learn the importance of CNT deployment with tactical teams during high-risk warrant service.

 
This 5-hour online presentation includes student activities which will reinforce concepts discussed in the presentation.

Students completing the entire course will receive a certificate for 5 hours of continuing education credit through MO POST.

Training Objectives:
1. Plan for high-risk warrant service operations
2. Use checklists and loud hail scripts for planning warrant service operations
3. Apply techniques for a non-responsive subject

Who should attend this course: Crisis negotiators and tactical operators.

Complimentary seats: WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through December 2020.

Intelligence-led Negotiation

2 hours Technical Studies (Online)
Presented by:
Troy King

Course Description: Learn how building a solid foundation of information and intelligence can establish a more informed and intentional approach to crisis negotiation.  Students will learn the importance of “The First Five Leads,” how checklists can facilitate a more thorough pursuit of information, Internet-based intelligence sources, electronic organization, and information sharing methods.

Training Objectives:
1. Build a foundation for information and intelligence management
2. Develop checklists for gathering intelligence
3. Conduct Internet-based searches

Who should attend this course: Patrol officers, CIT Officers, ECIT Officers, Crisis Negotiators, Dispatchers and Patrol Supervisors.

Complimentary seats:  WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through December 2020.

Officer Down! – Crisis Negotiation Case Study

3 hours Technical Studies (Online)
Presented by: Cpl Duane Boynton, Vancouver, WA PD

Course Description: This 3-hour presentation is a case study involving the crisis response to a 2010 ‘Officer Down’ incident wherein the subject had injured a police officer and subsequently.

Training Objectives:
1. Recognize the impact of mindset and bias during an incident involving an injured officer.
2. Apply flexible strategies for team assignments during an evolving crisis response.
3. Apply corrective action to a breakdown in intra-team communication.
4. Validate intelligence in an unstable information environment.

Who should attend this course: ECIT officers, crisis negotiators, tactical operators, and crisis negotiation supervisors.

Complimentary seats: WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through December 2020.

Recruiting and Selecting Teams for Crisis Negotiation

2 hours Technical Studies (Online)
Presented by: Troy KingDanny Johnson

Course Description: Selecting the right people to serve on a crisis negotiation team may be the most important decision a team makes.

Identifying and recruiting team players who round-out skills that go beyond being a good negotiator is critical to having a team that can accomplish all that makes a team great during operational and non-operational periods.

Students will learn how to prepare selection policy, write oral boards, select applicants based on crisis negotiation core competencies, and reduce turnover on crisis negotiation teams.

Students will be provided sample oral boards to take back to their team.

Training Objectives: 
1. Identify core competencies for crisis negotiators.
2. Recruit crisis negotiators to crisis negotiation teams.
3. Retain crisis negotiators on crisis negotiation teams.

Who should attend this course: Crisis negotiation team members and crisis negotiation supervisors.

Complimentary seats: WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through December 2020.

Responding to the Adolescent in Crisis

2 hours Interpersonal Communication (Online)
Presented by:
Deb McMahon

Course Description: Adolescents experience mental health crises unique to their emotional and sociological development – you will learn how these issues differ from those of an adult. You will also learn of youth suicide trends within the U.S., developmental phases of adolescents and the impact on communication as well as intervention guidelines during for active crisis.

Training Objectives
1. Identify health issues unique to childhood and adolescence
2. Recognize suicide trends of youth in the U.S.
3. Apply communication guidelines for adolescent intervention.

Who should attend this course: Patrol officers, CIT Officers, ECIT Officers, Crisis Negotiators, Dispatchers and Patrol Supervisors.

Complimentary seats: WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through December 2020.

Roadside/Rural Crisis Negotiation

2 hours Technical Studies (Online)
Presented by: Michael Clyde

Course Description: In this 2-hour block of instruction we will explore non-traditional types of rural crisis negotiation and the challenges associated with them as well as practical techniques oriented to successful outcomes. We will explore how best practices apply to these situations through case studies and classroom discussion.

Training Objectives:
1. Identify methods for overcoming challenges associated with rural crisis negotiation.
2. Identify methods for overcoming challenges associated with roadside crisis negotiation.

Who should attend this course: Patrol officers, CIT Officers, ECIT Officers, Crisis Negotiators, Dispatchers and Patrol Supervisors.

Complimentary seats:  WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through December 2020.

Strategic Communication for Crisis Intervention

3 hours Interpersonal Communication (Online)
Presented by: Troy King

Course Description: In crisis negotiation, Active Listening Skills (ALS) are a fundamental, yet basic, skill set. The Behavioral Influence Stairway Model (BISM) is also a key component of leading a resistant subject to desired behavior change. Often, negotiators find themselves using these basic skills with no meaningful behavior change. In these cases, a more strategic approach to communicating with the subject may help resolve the incident.

Strategic Communication requires the negotiator to design communication strategies which incorporate factors present during the situation, including the subject’s capacity to empathize with others, the subject’s character traits, and the scene dynamics.

This 3-hour online presentation includes student activities which will reinforce concepts discussed in the presentation.

Training Objectives: 
1. Identify a subject’s motivation, values, and fears which may impact de-escalation attempts and barriers to resolution.
2. Apply conversational themes to build rapport and influence.
3. Use resolution themes to lower barriers to resolution for subjects in crisis

Who should attend this course: CIT officers, ECIT officers, crisis negotiators, and dispatchers.

Complimentary seats: WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through October 2020.

Team Building for CNTs: Brainstorming and Decision Making

2 hours Technical Studies (Online)
Presented by: Troy KingDeb McMahon

Course Description: Decisions made by a group are usually better than decisions made by a single person.  Teams must take advantage of their time off the phone to engage in structured brainstorming.  It is a powerful technique to help negotiators assess risk and plan tactics.

Structuring brainstorming is more than just kicking around good ideas about what the negotiator is going to say the next time he or she is on the phone – it’s about strategizing toward a successful and risk-effective resolution.

Students will learn tried and true techniques for making the best of structured brainstorming sessions.

The most significant decision made during a crisis incident will involve a decision to use deadly force.  Decisions will be based on the information available and the best decisions will be based on timely and accurate information.

Proficiency in making decisions during a chaotic and emotionally driven incident requires teams to develop strategies for gathering information as quickly as possible with an understanding there is not enough time to apply traditional decision-making models.

This course prepares students to develop effective techniques for both structured brainstorming and the important decisions that follow.

Training Objectives: 
1. Apply effective brainstorming techniques.
2. Apply effective decision-making processes.
3. Use checklists and forms to facilitate decision making.

Who should attend this course: Crisis negotiators

Complimentary seats: WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through December 2020.

Team Building for CNTs: Motivation and Communication

2 hours Technical Studies (Online)
Presented by: Troy King, Deb McMahon

Course Description: This course is designed to prepare team members, and specifically team leaders, for the challenging task of motivating and communicating effectively with team members.

 
Students will learn the benefits of a team structure; one that is based on tactics and strategy.
 
When a team is created with a clear definition of roles and norms – strategic goals of the team are more easily met. Structure also serves as a foundation for highly motivated teams to communicate well with one another.

Students will also learn team motivational guidelines including leadership, advocacy, standards and accountability for crisis negotiation teams.

Lastly, students will learn the importance of trust and rapport within a team as the critical leverage for building genuine rapport and trust with those in crisis.

There will also be a team-building activity which students can use with their teams.

Training Objectives: 
1. Recognize the value of team structure.
2. Apply motivational guidelines for crisis negotiation teams.
3. Build rapport and trust within a CNT.

Who should attend this course: Crisis negotiators.

Complimentary seats: WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through December 2020.

Theme-based Crisis Negotiation

3 hours Interpersonal Communication (Online)
Presented by: Troy King

Course Description: In crisis negotiation, Active Listening Skills (ALS) are a fundamental, yet basic, skill set. The Behavioral Influence Stairway Model (BISM) is also a key component of leading a resistant subject to desired behavior change. Often, negotiators find themselves using these basic skills with no meaningful behavior change. In these cases, a more strategic approach to communicating with the subject may help resolve the crisis.

 
Theme-based negotiation requires the negotiator to design communication strategies which incorporate factors present during an incident, including the subject’s motivation, values, hopes, needs, and fears, their capacity to empathize with others, context and scene dynamics.
 
This 3-hour online presentation includes student activities which will reinforce concepts discussed in the presentation.

 

Training Objectives:
1. Identify a subject’s motivation, values, hopes, needs and fears which may impact de-escalation and barriers to resolution.
2. Apply conversational themes to build rapport and influence.
3. Use resolution themes to lower barriers to resolution for subjects in crisis.

Who should attend this course: CIT officers, ECIT officers, crisis negotiators, and dispatchers.

Complimentary seats: WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through December 2020.

Welcome to the Team! – An Introduction for New Crisis Negotiators

2 hours Technical Studies (Online)
Presented by: Danny JohnsonTroy King, Deb McMahonMichael Clyde

Course Description: This 2-hour presentation serves as an introduction for newly assigned team members or as a refresher for experienced team members.  This presentation addresses the importance of understanding the basic premise of crisis negotiation and the value of crisis negotiators in mitigating a variety of crises in a modern policing environment.  This introduction will help negotiators serve as a productive member of their team, from understanding policy to making a call-out book and a go-bag to understanding the formal and informal rules of the team.

Lastly, the presentation will address the 25 “Maxisms” that will help make for better crisis negotiators including the importance of venting, planning calls, pacing and having a ‘back pocket’ question.

Training Objectives:
1. Recognize critical role of crisis negotiators in the mitigation of crises
2. Prepare to serve on a crisis negotiation team
3. Apply ‘Maxisms’ to effective crisis negotiation

Who should attend this course: New crisis negotiators or experienced crisis negotiators needing a refresher course.

Complimentary seats: WSHNA, MACN, IACN, BANG members and NCNA Representatives or their designees through December 2020.

Peer Support for the Family

2 hours Interpersonal Communication (Online)
Presented by: Tanya Zaglauer-Schmell, Tamara Spencer, Dr. Barbara Palomino

Course Description: This 2-hour interactive course is designed especially for first responders and their families. This course goes beyond what we have learned about the impact of stress on first responders and delves into the impact of stress on families.  Students will learn about the effects of stress on the family and practical steps to promote family wellness.

More importantly, students will learn to foster healthy post trauma relationships by understanding the impact of traumatic stress and mitigating the adverse impact. Lastly, students will learn to help families cope with shiftwork, sleep and unpredictable hours.

Training Objectives:
1. Identify the effects of law enforcement stress on the family
2. Identify strategies for reducing the effects of police stress on the family
3. Recognize the effects of post traumatic relationships
4. Cope with shiftwork, sleep, and unpredictable hours

Who should attend this course: First responders, supervisors, dispatchers, peer supporter personnel, corrections officers, mental health professionals and chaplains working in support of first responders, and family members of first responders.

Complimentary seats: Family members of first responders and specified comp seats on a course-by-course basis.

Resiliency for Emergency Services

2 hours Interpersonal Communication (Online)
Presented by: Tanya Zaglauer-Schmell, Tamara Spencer, Dr. Barbara Palomino

Course description: Emergency services personnel operate in a stressful, high-risk environment every day. Psychological support after a traumatic event has lost much of its stigma and has become a viable option for mitigating the effects of traumatic stress. But why wait until after an event when we have methods to reduce cumulative stress?

It is possible through training and conditioning to make stronger men and women who will not only perform more efficiently on the job but will be healthier and stronger for their families. This two-hour course will guide students toward an understanding between resiliency and its link to stress as well as an understanding of the emotional and psychological factors which enhance resiliency.

Mental preparedness and resilience are essential components of long-term survival.  Survival is by choice, not by chance.  Survival comes from keeping a positive attitude as well as anticipating and mitigating fear. Practical methods for developing resiliency will be presented.

Building resiliency not only prepares emergency responders for life and death decisions, but also reduces conditions that require extensive post-incident intervention.

Prior to attending the course, students will receive by email, a resilience self-evaluation as a tool for individual growth and a lead-in to class discussion.

Each student will receive a certificate for their attendance.

Training Objectives:
1. Identify the link between the concept of human resiliency and stress
2. Understand psychological and emotional factors contributing to resiliency
3. Identify physiological factors contributing to resiliency
4. Develop resiliency

Who should attend this course: Any member of the emergency services including law enforcement, fire and rescue personnel and dispatchers.

Complimentary seats: Determined on a course-by-course basis.

De-escalation for First Responders (Fire/EMS/Hospital Staff)

8 hours Interpersonal Perspectives (Online)
Conducted in two 4-hour sessions over two days
Presented by: Staff

Course Description: This is an online course presented in two 4-hour modules over a two-day period. While crisis de-escalation has historically been the focus of primarily law enforcement resources, many non-law enforcement responders are finding themselves in situations where de-escalation skills are needed for the safe and effective outcome of interactions.

First responders such as firefighters and emergency medical service (EMS) providers often respond to situations which may involve persons experiencing an emotional or mental health crisis, creating the need for de-escalation skills. Many of these situations can be effectively resolved through the proper application of de-escalation techniques, while others will rise to a level requiring law enforcement support. Understanding the interface between dispatchers, fire, EMS and law enforcement is critical to developing a community-wide system of assisting persons in crisis.

This 8-hour online presentation includes student activities which will reinforce concepts discussed in the presentation.

Training Objectives:
Module 1: Introduction to De-escalation for First Responders – 4 hours Interpersonal Perspectives (Day 1) 
1. Define de-escalation as it relates to first responders
2. Identify factors impacting de-escalation
3. Apply de-escalation techniques

Module 2: Crisis Intervention for First Responders – 4 Hours Interpersonal Perspectives (Day 2)
1. Recognize the impact of mental illness on providing services
2. Apply effective suicide intervention techniques
3. Apply high element techniques for first responders
4. Recognize strategies for interfacing with other responder elements

Who should attend this course: All first responders and emergency hospital staff.

Complimentary seats: Discounts available for multiple paid enrollments.

De-escalation for Public Service Employees

2 hours Interpersonal Communication (Online)
Presented by:
Danny JohnsonTroy KingDeb McMahonMichael ClydeTanya Zaglauer

Course Description: This 2-hour presentation is specially designed for public service employees who, on a daily basis, have occasion to encounter hostile and potentially dangerous customers or clients.  Attendees will learn of conditions adversely impacting de-escalation, the impact of over- or underreacting, and how to recognize personal triggers.

Attendees will also learn the value of crisis rehearsals and mental threat assessments as a consideration of a risk-aware response.

Most importantly, attendees will learn practical tips for de-escalation, confirming non-compliance and knowing when it’s time to call the police or disengage with the customer or client.

Each attendee will receive a certificate of completion.

Training Objectives:
1. Define de-escalation as it relates to public service employees
2. Identify factors impacting de-escalation
3. Apply practical de-escalation techniques

Who should attend this course: Anyone having contact with potentially hostile or violent customers or clients including government employees, non-profit service agencies, emergency responders, hospital staff, church staff, educational administrators, retail employees, customer service representatives, social service employees, transit operators or compliance enforcement employees.

Complimentary seats: Discounts available for multiple paid enrollments.