CSM offers the 120-hour Certificate of Proficiency for Crisis Negotiators who complete Crisis/Hostage Negotiation Levels I-III with CSM during a 10-year period. Upon completion of the Crisis/Hostage Negotiation Level III, students will be awarded the Certificate of Proficiency. The requirement to attended each of the three levels with CSM is not waivable under any conditions.

CRISIS/HOSTAGE NEGOTIATION LEVEL I

(BASIC) – 40 Hours

The first in a series of three progressive courses, Crisis Hostage Negotiation – Level I (Basic) addresses the fundamental tasks of a successful crisis negotiator. This course will prepare you to work as part of a coordinated negotiation team and handle a variety of crisis situations including those involving hostage takers, barricaded subjects, and potential suicide victims.

You will learn the nation’s best practices as they relate to a team-oriented approach to crisis negotiation as well as gain a thorough understanding of duties for each member of the team.

The effective application of active listening skills and the Behavioral Influence Stairway Model will be discussed at length and reemphasized throughout the progression of all three courses. Active listening skills and the development of rapport serve as the foundation of successful crisis negotiation; these are topics which are presented in detail and reinforced throughout the course.

You will learn how a negotiation progresses, from the introduction to the resolution, and specific strategies and techniques to be used along the way. We will discuss when negotiation may not be the best solution, what items are negotiable and non-negotiable, and what to do in non-response situations.

The management of intelligence and information is a critical aspect of mitigating any law enforcement threat, and you will learn specific techniques for managing the flow of information during a crisis.

You will also gain a basic understanding of mental health crises and will learn to recognize the characteristics of a mental health crisis as well as strategies for affecting a positive outcome.

In that the risk of suicide is present in the majority of crisis incidents, we will have a detailed discussion on law enforcement’s response to suicidal persons.  You will learn to identify risk indicators of suicide and the immediacy of suicidal intent as well as practical intervention techniques.

Challenging, team-oriented, scenario-driven practical exercises are an integral part of the course and will allow you the opportunity to practice and refine your crisis negotiation skills.

TOPICS INCLUDE:

Introduction to Crisis Negotiation
Negotiating as a Team
Effective Communication
Law Enforcement’s Response to a Crisis
Principles of Crisis Negotiation
Intelligence and Information Management
Abnormal Psychology
Suicide Intervention for Law Enforcement

PREREQUISITES:

You must be a sworn member of law enforcement or corrections, a non-law enforcement member of a crisis negotiation team, or a mental health professional or a clergy member supporting law enforcement activities, to attend this course. Requests for exceptions must be submitted and approved by the course director.

NOTE: This course meets most state, Department of Defense, and federal training requirements for crisis-hostage negotiator certification, and is trained in accordance wit
guidelines established by the National Council of Negotiation Associations.

This course is approved as a “full credit” basic course toward a 120-hour CSM Certificate of Proficiency.

CRISIS/HOSTAGE NEGOTIATION LEVEL II

(INTERMEDIATE) – 40 Hours

This course will further enhance the knowledge and skills acquired in the Crisis Hostage Negotiation Level I – Basic course, or its 40-hour equivalent. Strategic Communication, Deliberate Strategy, Using Third-party Intermediaries and Interpreters, High Element Negotiation and Tactical Considerations are among the intermediate topics.

Strategic Communication requires the negotiator to develop strategies which incorporate factors present in an incident, including the subject’s capacity to empathize with others, the subject’s character traits, and the scene dynamics; you will learn how to effectively leverage these factors. This block focuses on theme development as an advanced communication technique for building rapport and influencing the subject toward resolution.

There will be an in-depth discussion of deliberate strategy that features concepts of risk assessment, structured brainstorming and decision-making as they relate to crisis negotiation.  Included is this block is a dynamic table-top exercise that challenges teams to consider critical elements in developing a meaningful team-oriented strategy.
The use of third-party intermediaries (TPIs) is a frequent consideration in police stand-offs.  An in-depth discussion introduces the use of a TPI vetting tool which is later reinforced during practical exercises.

In regard to the hostages involved, we will show you how to interpret the behavior of hostages while in captivity and techniques you can use when dealing with them directly. The consideration of hostages when developing a deliberate strategy will be explored as well as considerations for managing released hostages.

Uniquely presented in this program are advanced techniques related to the questions posed to subjects and appropriate responses based on the “Bunches of Five.” You will learn how to say “no,” how to show empathy, and how to keep dialogue moving forward in a positive direction.

We will discuss in depth tactical considerations during crisis incidents involving high-risk warrant service, hostage taking and barricaded subject incidents.

We will examine Subject Precipitated Homicide, Suicide-by-Cop, and behaviors meant to compel law enforcement to respond with deadly force. You will learn how to assess behavior, evaluate risk, and apply techniques in consideration of behavior and risk.

Lastly, situations that create unique challenges for law enforcement, such as jumpers from bridges, cell towers and overpasses, will be among the advanced concepts discussed.  You will also learn guidelines for scene management and working with rescue personnel at the scene.

Challenging, team-oriented, scenario-driven practical exercises are an integral part of the course and will allow you the opportunity to practice and refine your crisis negotiation skills.

TOPICS INCLUDE:

Strategic Communication
Applying  Deliberate Strategy
Use of Third-party Intermediaries and Interpreters
The Hostage Experience
Advanced Communication Techniques (Questions/Responses)
Tactical Considerations
Subject Precipitated Homicide
High Element Negotiation

PREREQUISITES:

You must be a sworn member of law enforcement or corrections, a non-law enforcement member of a crisis negotiation team, or a mental health professional or a clergy member supporting law enforcement activities, to attend this course. Students attending must have successfully completed the Crisis Hostage Negotiation – Level I (Basic) course, or its 40-hour equivalent. This course is not open to students with no prior negotiation training. Requests for exceptions for Level I equivalents must be submitted and approved by the course director.

NOTE: This course is trained in accordance with guidelines established by the National Council of Negotiation Associations.

This course is approved as a “full credit” intermediate course toward a 120-hour CSM Certificate of Proficiency.

CRISIS/HOSTAGE NEGOTIATION LEVEL III

(ADVANCED) – 40 Hours

The third in a series of three progressive courses, Crisis Hostage Negotiation – Level III (Advanced) prepares you for the most complex and challenging aspects of crisis negotiation – leading crisis negotiation teams and managing crisis incidents. We will take you from policy development, to recruiting, selecting, and training crisis negotiation teams, and to managing legal risk.

We will begin with an in-depth look at policy development for crisis negotiation teams and addressing a number of issues including responsibilities, procedures, training, and critical
liabilities related to policy.

Selecting the right personnel to serve on a negotiation team may be the most important decision a team makes; we will discuss the core competencies of effective crisis negotiators
and methods for their selection.

Operational case studies are an integral aspect of developing teams and establishing best practices within the field of crisis negotiation.  Students will learn how to prepare case studies for presentation for peer audiences.  Many of the case studies prepared within this academic environment have gone on to be popular at state negotiation association conferences around the country.

Among the most challenging aspects of being a Crisis Negotiation Team Leader is planning, facilitating and evaluating scenario-driven training.  You will learn how to turn relevant training objectives into a valuable training day for your team. An in-depth look at writing meaningful team-oriented scenarios will assist team leaders in creating realistic training

Students will also learn how to conduct meaningful operational debriefings that help your team grow from both training and operational experiences.

An advanced special population negotiation topic will be presented, giving insight and tools for negotiating with a particular special population. Past topics have included:
Negotiating in a Corrections Environment, Negotiating with the Fellow Officer, Negotiating with Sovereign Citizens, and more.

‘20 Team Hacks’ is a contemporary look at what Team Leaders can do to improve team performance and standing within their agency and community. Each of the Team Hacks presented are steps Team Leaders can take back to their agencies and begin to implement immediately.

In keeping with the advanced nature of this course, students will plan, facilitate, and evaluate a culminating scenario-driven practical exercise. Student performance will be carefully evaluated and in-depth feedback will be provided during a comprehensive after-action debriefing.

Students will also participate as a member of a small group responsible for developing and presenting projects in one of five topic areas:  Case study preparation, team selection, training facilitation, scenario writing or policy development.

TOPICS INCLUDE:

Policy Development for Crisis Negotiation
Recruiting, Selecting, and Training Crisis Negotiation Teams
Preparing Case Studies for Crisis Negotiation
Planning, Facilitating, and Evaluating Scenario-driven Training
Operational Debriefings
Contemporary Issues in Crisis Negotiation
20 Team Hacks for Crisis Negotiation Teams

PREREQUISITES:

You must be a sworn member of law enforcement or corrections, a non-law enforcement member of a crisis negotiation team, or a mental health professional or a clergy member supporting law enforcement activities, to attend this course. Students attending must have successfully completed both Crisis Hostage Negotiations – Level I (Basic) course, or its 40-hour equivalent, and a Crisis Hostage Negotiation – Level II (Intermediate) course or its 40-hour equivalent, prior to attending this course. This course is not open to students with no prior negotiation training and experience. One of the two prerequisite courses must have been instructed through CSM. Requests for exceptions for Level I and Level II equivalents must be submitted and approved by the course director.

NOTE: This course is trained in accordance with guidelines established by the National Council of Negotiation Associations.

This course is approved as a “full credit” course toward a 120-hour CSM Certificate of Proficiency.

NEGOTIATING IN A CORRECTIONS ENVIRONMENT

(BASIC) – 40 Hours

The Negotiating in a Corrections Environment Course (Level I/Basic) is a practical introductory course of instruction for newly assigned negotiators or negotiators having a five-years or more lapse in negotiation training. The basic course is the first in a series of three progressive courses. The basic course meets or exceeds most state and federal training requirements for crisis/hostage negotiator certification and is trained in accordance with guidelines established by the National Council of Negotiation Associations.

This course begins with a historical perspective of crisis negotiation in corrections, the basic premise of crisis negotiation, types of crisis incidents, and terminology as it relates to crisis negotiation. Students will also learn the fundamental requirements of a unified response including containment, security, and risk management.

You will learn the nation’s best practices as they relate to a team-oriented approach to crisis negotiation as well as gain a thorough understanding of duties for each member of the team.

Effective communication as a core competency will address the Behavioral Influence Stairway Model, Active Listening Skills (ALS), and the roles of rapport and influence as they relate to crisis negotiation.

You will learn how crisis negotiation progresses, from the introduction to the resolution, and specific strategies and techniques to be used along the way. We will discuss demands and deadlines, what items are negotiable and non-negotiable, when negotiation may not be the best solution and how to recognize when negotiation is progressing.

At the heart of a well-managed incident is well-managed information and intelligence. Students will learn how to gather, manage and apply crisis intelligence and information by applying a systematic approach as well as how to maintain legally sufficient incident documents.

Many crisis incidents in a corrections environment involve suicidal ideations and intent. Students will learn how to recognize suicidal indicators, assess the immediacy of suicidal intent and apply suicide intervention techniques.

Students will also participate as a team in well-developed practical exercises that reinforce concepts presented during lecture. The scenarios are written specifically for a  corrections environment and are not simply modified from law enforcement scenarios. After each practical exercise, students will participate in a facilitator-led operational debriefing.

TOPICS INCLUDE:

The History of Crisis Negotiation in Corrections
Negotiating as a Team
Effective Communication
Negotiating in a Corrections Environment
Principles of Crisis Negotiation
Information and Intelligence Management
Managing the Mental Health Crisis
Anticipating and Surviving the Hostage Crisis
Suicide Intervention in Corrections

PREREQUISITES:

You must be a sworn member of law enforcement or corrections, a non-law enforcement member of a crisis negotiation team, or a mental health professional or a clergy member
supporting law enforcement or corrections activities to attend this class. This course is not recommended for negotiators without a corrections affiliation. Requests for exceptions
must be submitted and approved by the course director.

NOTE: This basic course meets most state and federal training requirements for crisis-hostage negotiator certification, is trained in accordance with guidelines established by the
National Council of Negotiation Associations.

This course is approved as a “full credit” basic course toward a 120-hour CSM Certificate of Proficiency.

NEGOTIATING WITH SPECIAL POPULATIONS

40 Hours

Negotiating with terrorists, the elderly, combat veterans, fellow officers, inmates, terrorists, the sovereign citizen extremist and troubled youth all present unique sets of challenges for a negotiator. In this advanced course designed specifically for experienced negotiators, you will learn proven methods for dealing with each of these groups.

PTSD and the high suicide rate within Department of Defense demand a closer look at the law enforcement response to a veteran in crisis. We will explore, in-depth, the
psychological wounds of veterans as they relate to crisis negotiation as well as specific negotiation strategies for mitigation.

The most lethal aspect of police work is suicide.  The suicidal fellow officer presents one of the most complex threats a law enforcement agency can face.  The presentation outlines predisposing factors of police suicide, factors affecting risk, and strategies for an effective intervention.

The availability of relevant intelligence, mental health assessments, facilities data, and the accountability of the inmate population are among a few of the advantages we will discuss in a corrections versus community’ discussion. Assessing threats, determining motivation, and developing a strategy are among the many topics discussed regarding negotiation with inmates.

Adolescents experience mental health issues unique to their emotional and sociological development and you will learn how these issues differ from those of an adult. You will also gain a basic understanding of the psychological motivations of an adolescent in crisis and learn to recognize the characteristics of an emotionally disturbed youth.

A suicidal adolescent who makes a decision to commit suicide at school presents a risk to both peers and faculty. You will learn to identify indicators of the immediacy of suicide intent as well as procedures for ensuring the safety of others.

We will also discuss the psychological and sociological aspects of the “Rampage School Shooter “ and the “Classroom Avenger” with special emphasis on negotiation techniques.

The conflicting ideologies the Sovereign Citizen Movement creates a unique challenge for the negotiator.  There are many personal beliefs and strong ideologies within the Sovereign Citizen Movement –  not all of which are criminal. Sovereign Citizen Extremists (SCE) are those who engage in a wide range of criminal behavior, including criminal occupation, planned violence, and schemes of fraud. You will learn of the wide variety of SCE, considerations for scene management and negotiation strategy.

There are as many different psychologies, motivations, and decision-making structures as there are types of terrorists. We will discuss the psychology of sub-state terrorism including Right-Wing, Social Revolutionary, National Separatist, Religious Extremist and Single-Issue terrorists. You will learn techniques for negotiating with both leaders and followers of a structured group during planned and unplanned incidents. We will also present an overview of Violent True Believers in the United States and techniques for responding to intended or planned violence.

The growing number of protest events around the country present opportunities for agencies to utilize negotiators in roles to improve communication channels and intelligence upon which the law enforcement response may be planned. We will discuss potential roles for negotiators in the protest setting.

Murder/suicide and suicide among the elderly are two of the fastest growing law enforcement problems in the United States. You will learn the sociological and psychological effects of aging, depression and the elderly, and techniques for generational communication.

‘Negotiating with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing is a presentation that facilitates an understanding of the deaf culture and the unique challenges of communicating with the hearing impaired.  The use of technology, interpreters and relay systems will be addressed.

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), members of the LGB community are more than twice as likely as heterosexual adults to experience depression and LGBTQ are at higher risk than the general population for suicidal thoughts and attempts. Students will gain a better understanding of how, during an intervention process, to transcend the double stigma of personal biases and mental health biases to apply supportive techniques.

You will gain a better understanding of each of the selected populations from both the psychological and sociological perspectives. More importantly, you will learn specific communication and negotiation strategies for mitigating a crisis.

Challenging, team-oriented, scenario-driven practical exercises are an integral part of the course and will allow you the opportunity to practice and refine your crisis negotiation skills while negotiating with someone from one of these special populations.

NOTE:  The course content for this program exceeds what is deliverable during a 40-hour course. One or more of these topics areas will be omitted based on availability of guest speakers and ‘lived experiences’ panels.

TOPICS INCLUDE:

Negotiating with Combat Veterans in Crisis
Negotiating with the Fellow Officer
Negotiating within the Corrections Environment
Negotiating with Troubled Youth
Negotiating with the Sovereign Citizen Extremist
Negotiating with Terrorists and Violent True Believers
Responding to the Protest Movement
Negotiating with the Elderly in Crisis
Responding to the LGBTQ Community in Crisis
Negotiating with the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

PREREQUISITES:

You must be a sworn member of law enforcement or corrections, a non-law enforcement member of a crisis negotiation team, a mental health professional or a clergy member
supporting law enforcement activities and have completed CSM’s Crisis Hostage Negotiations – Level I (Basic) course, or an equivalent 40-hour crisis negotiation course, prior to attending this class. Requests for exceptions must be submitted and approved by the course director.

NOTE: This course alone does not meet state and federal training requirements for crisis-hostage negotiator certification; however, it is intended as an advanced/ refresher for previously trained and experienced negotiators.

NEGOTIATING IN A SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT

20 Hours

This unique 3-day course will prepare the experienced crisis negotiator to deal with the very contemporary and relevant topic of adolescents who present a threat in a school environment by taking hostages or attempting to commit suicide.

We will explore historical school violence trends throughout the U.S. and the role law enforcement plays in mitigating threats. In the review of previous incidents of school violence, we are able to identify common behavioral and motivational factors as well as the role of mental illness and suicidal intent.

As an important aspect of pre-incident planning, you will learn how to work collaboratively with school officials when organizing a school response. Schools have well-established plans and procedures for responding to threats and it is important to understand the importance of a collaborative response.

To better understand how negotiators must coordinate their efforts with first responders and tactical teams, you will receive an overview of the tactical response in a school environment.

Adolescents experience mental health issues unique to their emotional and sociological development and you will learn how these issues differ from those of an adult. You will also gain a basic understanding of the psychological motivations of an adolescent in crisis and learn to recognize the characteristics of an emotionally disturbed youth.

A suicidal adolescent who makes a decision to commit suicide at school presents a risk to both peers and faculty. You will learn to identify indicators of the immediacy of suicide intent as well as procedures for ensuring the safety of others.

The “Rampage School Shooter” will begin with a discussion of the “Pathway to Intended Violence” and how the “Rampage School Shooter” compares to Workplace Violence and incidents involving a “Violent True Believer”.  We will also discuss the psychological and sociological aspects of the “Rampage School Shooter” with special emphasis on mental health factors, communication and de-escalation techniques.

The course will culminate with one of the program’s most challenging scenario-driven practical exercises allowing you to refine your negotiation team work as well as your own personal negotiation skills.

TOPICS INCLUDE:

History of School Violence in the United States
Pre-incident Planning for the School Response
Overview of the Tactical Response
Adolescent Mental Health
Adolescent Suicide
Responding to the “Rampage School Shooter”

PREREQUISITES:

You must be a sworn member of law enforcement or juvenile corrections, a non-law enforcement member of a crisis negotiation team, a mental health professional or a clergy member supporting law enforcement or school activities, a school resource officer, or a member of a school staff assigned duties to a crisis incident response team and have successfully completed CSM’s Crisis Hostage Negotiations – Level I (Basic) course, or an equivalent 40-hour crisis negotiation course, to attend this class. Requests for exceptions must be submitted and approved by the course director.

NOTE: This course alone does not meet state and federal training requirements for crisis-hostage negotiator certification; however, it is intended as an advanced/refresher for previously trained and experienced negotiators.